hunting@shona-adventures.com
Mobile (+264) 81 128 3105
hunting@shona-adventures.com
Mobile (+264) 81 128 3105
Gateway To Victoria Falls

Chobe National Park

The Chobe National Park Excursion forms part of our Extended Tours and can be added as part of our Victoria Falls Excursion. Various options of travel and accommodation are available and can be customized to fit individual budget requirements. We do recommend this excursion for children, please just advise us on their interest in order for us to make recommendations on travel and activities for them. For clients hunting Dangerous Game in the Caprivi, this excursion can be done as a day trip from any of our Caprivi Concessions. 

 

Leopard resting in a tree on the banks of the Chobe Rivier

 

Chobe National Park, in northern Botswana, has one of the largest concentrations of game in Africa. By size, it is the third largest park in the country, after the Central Kalahari Game Reserve and the Gemsbok National Park, and is the most biologically diverse. It is also Botswana’s first national park.

The original inhabitants of this area were the San bushmen (also known as the Basarwa people in Botswana). They were nomadic hunter-gatherers who were constantly moving from place to place to find food sources, namely fruits, water and wild animals. Nowadays one can find San paintings inside rocky hills of the park.

Source:Wikipedia

One of the most unique and highly reccomended experiences is a couple of nights stay on one of the house boats on the Chobe River. 

The park is widely known for its spectacular elephant population: It contains an estimated 50,000 elephants, perhaps the highest elephant concentration of Africa, and part of the largest continuous surviving elephant population. The elephant population seems to have solidly built up since 1990, from a few thousand.

Elephants living here are Kalahari elephants, the largest in size of all known elephant populations. They are characterized by rather brittle ivory and short tusks, perhaps due to calcium deficiency in the soils.

Damage caused by the high numbers of elephants is rife in some areas. In fact, concentration is so high throughout Chobe that culls have been considered, but are too controversial and have thus far been rejected.

At dry season, these elephants sojourn in Chobe River and the Linyanti River areas. At rain season, they make a 200-km migration to the southeast stretch of the park. Their distribution zone however outreaches the park and spreads to northwestern Zimbabwe.

Source Wikipedia